Description

Chitawan National Park has also been enlisted in World’s natural heritage list, which itself define its importance. Chitwan National Park is one of the best choices of destination to jungle safari for those who want to observe natural vegetation and wildlife in origin of nature’s lap. Chitwan National Park is wilderness of rich ecosystem that includes mammals, birds, reptiles and water animals of numerous kinds, which makes everyone exciting as well as amazing too. During the observation time through jeep or elephant, gives you an opportunity to share your fantasy feelings to the wilder and more wildly with the animals like rhino, crocodile, monkeys, pythons, deer; other different kinds of aves. You may also enjoy with the colorful and superb Tharu Culture which are known as the ancient and older beginners of the teria part.

Itinerary

Cost Details

Cost Includes

  • Transport (from Kathmandu)
  • Elephant back safaris
  • Nature walks
  • Village tours
  • Bird-watching excursions
  • All meals
  • Other activities (cultural dance display, canoe ride, etc.
  • National Park entry fees
  • Bring insect repellant, sunscreen and your swimming costume. A pair of binoculars is also a good idea.

Cost Excludes

  • Nepal entry visa cost
  • Travel insurance
  • Personal expenses like drinks, laundry, Tips etc.

Departures

This is departure.

Information

Chitwan National Park formerly Royal Chitwan National Park is the first national park in Nepal. It was established in 1973 and granted the status of a World Heritage Site in 1984. It covers an area of 932 km2 (360 sq mi) and is located in the subtropical Inner Terai lowlands of south-central Nepal in the Chitwan District. In altitude it ranges from about 100 m (330 ft) in the river valleys to 815 m (2,674 ft) in the Churia Hills.

The Chitwan National Park is home to at least 43 species of mammals. The “King of the Jungle” is the Bengal tiger. The alluvial floodplain habitat of the Terai is one of the best tiger habitats anywhere in the world. Since the establishment of Chitwan National Park the initially small population of about 25 individuals increased to 70–110 in 1980. In some years this population has declined due to poaching and floods. In a long-term study carried out from 1995–2002 tiger researchers identified a relative abundance of 82 breeding tigers and a density of 6 females per 100 km2.[10] Information obtained from camera traps in 2010 and 2011 indicated that tiger density ranged between 4.44 and 6.35 individuals per 100 km2. They offset their temporal activity patterns to be much less active during the day when human activity peaked.

 

Funna

The wide range of vegetation types in the Chitwan National Park is haunt of more than 700 species of wildlife and a not yet fully surveyed number of butterfly, moth and insect species. Apart from King Cobra and Rock python, 17 other species of snakes, starred tortoise and monitor lizards occur. The Narayani-Rapti river system, their small tributaries and myriads of oxbow lakes is habitat for 113 recorded species of fish and mugger crocodiles.

In the early 1950s, about 235 gharials occurred in the Narayani River. The population has dramatically declined to only 38 wild gharials in 2003. Every year gharial eggs are collected along the rivers to be hatched in the breeding center of the Gharial Conservation Project, where animals are reared to an age of 6–9 years. Every year young gharials are reintroduced into the Narayani-Rapti river system, of which sadly only very few survive.

 

Mamals:

Leopards are most prevalent on the peripheries of the park. They co-exist with tigers, but being socially subordinate are not common in prime tiger habitat.[12] In 1988, a clouded leopard was captured and radio-collared outside the protected area, and released into the park but did not stay.[13]

Chitwan is considered to have the highest population density of sloth bears with an estimated 200 to 250 individuals. Smooth-coated otters inhabit the numerous creeks and rivulets. Bengal foxes, spotted linsangs and honey badgers roam the jungle for prey. Striped hyenas prevail on the southern slopes of the Churia Hills.[14] During a camera trapping survey in 2011, wild dogs were recorded in the southern and western parts of the park, as well as golden jackals, fishing cats, jungle cats, leopard cats, large and small Indian civets, Asian palm civets, crab-eating mongooses and yellow-throated martens.[15]

 

One-horned rhinoceros

Rhinoceros: since 1973 the population has recovered well and increased to 544 animals around the turn of the century. To ensure the survival of the endangered species in case of epidemics animals are translocated annually from Chitwan to the Bardia National Park and the Sukla Phanta Wildlife Reserve since 1986. However, the population has repeatedly been jeopardized by poaching: in 2002 alone, poachers killed 37 individuals in order to saw off and sell their valuable horns.

From time to time wild elephant bulls find their way from Valmiki National Park into the valleys of the park, apparently in search of elephant cows willing to mate.

Gaurs spend most of the year in the less accessible Churia Hills in the south of the national park. But when the bush fires ease off in springtime and lush grasses start growing up again, they descend into the grassland and riverine forests to graze and browse. The Chitwan population of the world’s largest wild cattle species has increased from 188 to 296 animals in the years 1997 to 2007.

Apart from numerous wild boars also sambar deer, Red muntjac, hog deer and herds of chital inhabit the park. Four-horned antelopes reside predominantly in the hills. Rhesus monkeys, hanuman langurs, Indian pangolins, Indian porcupines, several species of flying squirrels, black-naped hares and endangered hispid hares are also present.

 

Birds

Every year dedicated bird watchers and conservationists survey bird species occurring all over the country. In 2006 they recorded 543 species in the Chitwan National Park, much more than in any other protected area in Nepal and about two-thirds of Nepal’s globally threatened species. Additionally, 20 black-chinned yuhina, a pair of Gould’s sunbird, a pair of blossom-headed parakeet and one slaty-breasted rail, an uncommon winter visitor, were sighted in spring 2008.

Especially the park’s alluvial grasslands are important habitats for the critically endangered Bengal florican, the vulnerable lesser adjutant, grey-crowned prinia, swamp francolin and several species of grass warblers. In 2005 more than 200 slender-billed babblers were sighted in 3 different grassland types.[18] The near threatened Oriental darter is a resident breeder around the many lakes, where also egrets, bitterns, storks and kingfisher abound. The park is one of the few known breeding sites of the globally threatened spotted eagle.

Peafowl and jungle fowl scratch their living on the forest floor.

Apart from the resident birds about 160 migrating and vagrant species arrive in Chitwan in autumn from northern latitudes to spend the winter here, among them the Greater Spotted Eagle, Eastern Imperial Eagle and Pallas’s Fish-eagle. Common sightings include Brahminy ducks and goosanders. Large flocks of bar-headed geese just rest for a few days in February on their way north.

As soon as the winter visitors have left in spring, the summer visitors arrive from southern latitudes. The calls of cuckoos herald the start of spring. The colourful Bengal Pittas and several sunbird species are common breeding visitors during monsoon. Among the many flycatcher species the Paradise flycatcher with his long undulating tail in flight is a spectacular sight. (Source: Wekipedia)

 

Responsible Travel

  • A proper VISA to enter and stay in Nepal is a must. There are reported cases when travelers are advised non-requirement of Nepal VISA by their travel agents. Practically every foreign national requires VISA to enter these countries.
  • Do not encourage beggars.
  • Don’t trust strangers with money. Trust your hotel, but not people you may bump into on the streets.
  • It is advisable to cover yourself with travel insurance for thefts, loss and medi-claim.
  • Carry proper maps of the places proposed to visit in Nepal, as signboards are often absent. Try to reach a station during daytime if traveling on your own. In any case avoid persistent touts and taxi-drivers at airport/stations/bus stand to help you find your hotel. Always use tourist assistance desk for proper advice.
  • Women traveling alone in certain deserted places should avoid walking at odd hours.
  • While changing money, insist on getting encashment certificate.
  • Do not checkout of the hotel in hurry. While checking out it has been noticed in some hotels, the extras are unreasonably charged which the guest hurriedly pays without cross-checking.
  • Do not leave your cash and valuables in your hotel rooms. Keep your cash divided in different pockets.
  • Take care of proper disposal of your rubbish always whether you are exploring Cities, Himalayas or anywhere else.
  • Always use strong suitcases/baggage, as mishandling is common at airports/stations.
  • Don’t tip unreasonably and unnecessarily in a hotel. The NEWS soon spreads in the hotel and by the time you checkout there will be a group of them saluting you to expect something.
  • Most of the monuments give very good discount for students from all over the world. They must carry there valid school identity card.

Review

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *